Category Archives: High Sierra

Muir Trail Ranch

Muir Trail Ranch offers the chance to return to a simpler time, away from the stress and demands of modern life.
Our High Sierra wilderness ranch has been made available for over half a century for individuals and families to enjoy. It’s like camping, but without the hassle – sleep in a real bed, enjoy delicious meals in a rustic dining room or on our barbecue terrace, and indulge in the incredible luxury of our enclosed hot spring pools.
Ride horses, take a hike, go fishing, swim in a warm lake, take pictures, lie on a rock and soak up the sun, take an overnight pack trip.

http://www.muirtrailranch.com/



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The Golden Ticket: Backpacking the John Muir Trail



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Eastern Sierra Transit Authority – California Public Transportation between Reno, Mammoth Lakes, Bishop, Lone Pine, Lancaster

Source: Eastern Sierra Transit Authority – California Public Transportation between Reno, Mammoth Lakes, Bishop, Lone Pine, Lancaster



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John Muir Trail – Wikipedia

The John Muir Trail (JMT) is a long-distance trail in the Sierra Nevada mountain range of California, passing through Yosemite, Kings Canyon and Sequoia National Parks. From the northern terminus at Happy Isles in Yosemite Valley (37.7317°N 119.5587°W) and the southern terminus located on the summit of Mount Whitney (36.5785°N 118.292°W), the Trail’s official length is 210.4 miles (338.6 km), with an elevation gain of approximately 47,000 feet (14,000 m).[1] For almost all of its length, the trail is in the High Sierra backcountry and wilderness areas.[2] For about 160 miles (260 km), the trail, named for naturalist John Muir, follows the same footpath as the longer Pacific Crest Trail.

The vast majority of the trail is situated within designated wilderness. The trail passes through large swaths of alpine and high mountain scenery, and lies almost entirely at or above 8,000 feet (2,400 m) in elevation. About 35% of the trail, including the entirety of the last 30 miles (48 km), lie above 10,000 feet (3,000 m).[3] The trail has been described as “America’s most famous trail”; known for its relative solitude, the trail sees about 1,500 thru-hiking attempts each year (including Pacific Crest Trail thru-hikers), many fewer than the number of attempts on comparable walks such as the southern portion of Appalachian Trail or the Way of St. James.[4][5][6][7]

Source: John Muir Trail – Wikipedia



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High Sierra Topix | Sierra Nevada Adventure Awaits

High Sierra Topix (HST) is a Sierra Nevada adventure community resource created by its members, for its members. Your Sierra Nevada Adventure Awaits!

Source: High Sierra Topix | Sierra Nevada Adventure Awaits



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John Muir Trail: The Essential Guide to Hiking America’s Most Famous Trail

Buy Here on Amazon: http://amzn.to/2i5vYuR

Elizabeth Wenk’s authoritative guide describes the 212-mile John Muir Trail, running from Yosemite Valley to the summit of Mt. Whitney. John Muir Trail provides all the necessary planning information, including up-to-date details on wilderness and permit regulations, food resupplies, trailhead amenities, and travel from nearby cities. Useful essentials are updated GPS coordinates and maps for prominent campsites (along with an updated list of sites along the trail), trail junctions, bear boxes, and other points of interest. The trail descriptions also include natural and human history to provide a workout for both body and mind — a must-have for any Muir Trail enthusiast. Note that the text includes the southbound trail description, while the full guide with the northbound description is available as a separate ebook product.



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BearVault Bear Canister

Buy Here on Amazon: http://amzn.to/2iQqSBL

  • Material: Transparent polycarbonate
  • Volume: 700 cu in 11.5 L
  • Dimensions: 8.7 x 12.7 in, 21 x 32 cm
  • Claimed Weight: 2 lb 9 oz, 1160 g
  • Recommended Use: Storing supplies/food in bear country



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Yogi’s Pacific Crest Trail Handbook (Yogi’s PCT Handbook)


December 2016 edition.

Buy Here on Amazon: http://amzn.to/2iNHNop

The thought of planning and completing a Pacific Crest Trail thru-hike can be overwhelming. There’s so much to learn: how to resupply, what shoes or gear to buy, how to survive in the desert and snow, etc. “Yogi’s Pacific Crest Trail Handbook” answers all these questions . . . and more.

This valuable planning and hiking resource is written by hikers for hikers. It takes the confusion out of pre-hike planning and on-trail logistics. It is a collection of different opinions from people who have thru-hiked the PCT. This is the stuff we wish we knew before we thru-hiked.

The first half is a collection of tips from previous PCT thru-hikers on a variety of hiking topics such as:

  • Maps and Guidebooks
  • Clothing
  • Footwear
  • Packs
  • Shelters
  • Sleeping Systems
  • Ultralight Hiking
  • Desert Advice
  • Sierra Advice
  • Resupply

The second half is the Trail Tips and Town Guide. This section is printed on perforated paper, so you can remove these pages from the bound book and take them with you on the trail. You’ll find:

  • How to get to and from each resupply location
  • Town maps
  • Maildrop info
  • Town info: resupply, lodging, restaurants, ATM, internet, fuel, shower, etc.
  • Historical water source information
  • Where to go at confusing trail junctions
  • Sierra-specific: tips for crossing the passes, bear box locations, canister-required areas, Sierra public bus info; detour info
  • The best places to eat
  • Hiker-friendly motels
  • 13-time PCT thru-hiker Scott Williamson has contributed his comments regarding water availability and places few people know about.

“Yogi’s Pacific Crest Trail Handbook” sets your dream in motion. The rest is up to you!

Buy Here on Amazon: http://amzn.to/2iNHNop



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Tahoe Rim Trail Association

Tahoe Rim Trail Association

Source: https://www.tahoerimtrail.org/



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