Category Archives: Trail Info

Pacific Crest Trail: Southern California

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This comprehensive guide provides in-depth coverage of the Pacific Crest Trail (PCT) from the Mexican border to Tuolumne Meadows in Yosemite National Park. Plan day hikes, weekend backpacks, or an extended thru-hike adventure with this indispensable resource.Our PCT gurus supply maps, photos, resupply access routes, side trips, and updated trail data. Learn about rocks, plants, animals, and human history along the trail. Plan for, trouble-shoot, and enjoy your PCT adventure with this authoritative guide. Over 200 maps included. Winner of the Classic Award in the 2008 National Outdoor Book Awards.



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Pacific Crest Trail: Oregon and Washington

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Stretching over 2600 miles from the Mexican to the Canadian border, the Pacific Crest Trail (PCT) passes through some of the most breathtaking scenery in the U.S. Each year hundreds of hikers attempt to complete the entire trail while thousands of others take it in smaller sections. Designed for thru hikers, section hikers, and day hikers it describes the official route, occasional alternate routes, side trips, and resupply points. The new edition contains a 9-page update, including the rerouted portion of the trail in Washington between Indian Pass and Miners Creek. Winner of the Classic Award in the 2008 National Outdoor Book Awards.



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John Muir Trail – Wikipedia

The John Muir Trail (JMT) is a long-distance trail in the Sierra Nevada mountain range of California, passing through Yosemite, Kings Canyon and Sequoia National Parks. From the northern terminus at Happy Isles in Yosemite Valley (37.7317°N 119.5587°W) and the southern terminus located on the summit of Mount Whitney (36.5785°N 118.292°W), the Trail’s official length is 210.4 miles (338.6 km), with an elevation gain of approximately 47,000 feet (14,000 m).[1] For almost all of its length, the trail is in the High Sierra backcountry and wilderness areas.[2] For about 160 miles (260 km), the trail, named for naturalist John Muir, follows the same footpath as the longer Pacific Crest Trail.

The vast majority of the trail is situated within designated wilderness. The trail passes through large swaths of alpine and high mountain scenery, and lies almost entirely at or above 8,000 feet (2,400 m) in elevation. About 35% of the trail, including the entirety of the last 30 miles (48 km), lie above 10,000 feet (3,000 m).[3] The trail has been described as “America’s most famous trail”; known for its relative solitude, the trail sees about 1,500 thru-hiking attempts each year (including Pacific Crest Trail thru-hikers), many fewer than the number of attempts on comparable walks such as the southern portion of Appalachian Trail or the Way of St. James.[4][5][6][7]

Source: John Muir Trail – Wikipedia



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Hayduke Trail – Wikipedia

The Hayduke Trail is an 812 mile long distance backpacking route across southern Utah and northern Arizona.[1] It “begins” in Arches National Park near Moab, Utah before heading through the Needles district of Canyonlands National Park, Capitol Reef National Park, Bryce Canyon National Park, the Grand Canyon National Park and ending in Zion National Park.[1]

This highly strenuous wilderness route is exclusively on public land and travels ridge lines, drainages, existing foot and game trails, dirt roads, and rivers. The highest point is Mount Ellen (Utah) in the Henry Mountains (UT) at 11,419 feet above sea level to a low in the Grand Canyon of near 2000 feet.[1]

The Hayduke Trail was named after George Washington Hayduke, a character from Edward Abbey‘s ‘The Monkey Wrench Gang.[2] It was created by Mike Coronella and Joe Mitchell, both of Utah, as the combination of several treks including a 94-day expedition in 1998 and a 101-day journey in 2000. “The Hayduke Trail: a Guide to the Backcountry Hiking Trail on the Colorado Plateau” was published by the University of Utah Press in 2005.[3]

Source: Hayduke Trail – Wikipedia



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Great Western Trail – Wikipedia

The Great Western Trail is a north-south long distance multiple use route which runs from Canada to Mexico through five western states in the United States. The trail has access for both motorized and non-motorized users and traverses 4,455 miles (7,170 km) through Arizona, Utah, Idaho, Wyoming, and Montana. Designated a National Millennium Trail.

Source: Great Western Trail – Wikipedia



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Florida Trail – Wikipedia

The Florida Trail is one of eleven National Scenic Trails in the United States currently running 1,000 miles (1,600 km),[1] with a total of 1,300 miles (2,100 km) planned, from Big Cypress National Preserve (between Miami and Naples, Florida along the Tamiami Trail) to Fort Pickens at Gulf Islands National Seashore, Pensacola Beach. Also known as the Florida National Scenic Trail (which applies only to its federally certified segments), the Florida Trail provides permanent non-motorized recreation opportunity for hiking and other compatible activities[2] and is within an hour of most Floridians. The Florida National Scenic Trail is designated as a National Scenic Trail by the National Trails System Act of 1968 (Public Law 90-543).[3]

With its first blaze marked by members of the Florida Trail Association at Clearwater Lake Recreation Area in the Ocala National Forest, the Florida Trail began on October 29, 1966. The Florida Trail was officially designated as a National Scenic Trail in 1983. The U.S. Forest Service, through the National Forests in Florida program, is the official administrator of the Florida National Scenic Trail (FNST), but trail development, maintenance, and management are a result of volunteers and land managers throughout the state.

 

Source: Florida Trail – Wikipedia



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Eastern Continental Trail – Wikipedia

The Eastern Continental Trail (ECT) is a combination of North American long-distance hiking trails, from Key West, Florida to Belle Isle (Newfoundland and Labrador) a distance of 5,400 miles (8,700 km). A thru-hike on this system of trails requires almost a year to complete. The first person to complete the ECT from Key West to Cap Gaspe, Quebec, was John Brinda from Washington State, in 1997.[1]

From south to north, the route strings together the Florida Keys Overseas Heritage Trail, the Florida Trail, a walk in forests and along roads through southern Alabama, the Pinhoti National Recreation Trail and part of the Benton MacKaye Trail in Georgia, to reach the southern terminus of the Appalachian Trail at Springer Mountain. The Appalachian Trail connects with the International Appalachian Trail; through Maine, New Brunswick, Quebec, and Newfoundland and Labrador.

The trail system was named by long-distance hiker M. J. Eberhart (trailname: Nimblewill Nomad).[2]

Source: Eastern Continental Trail – Wikipedia



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Backbone Trail – Wikipedia

The Backbone Trail is a long distance trail extending 67.79 miles[1] (109.10 km) across the length of the Santa Monica Mountains in the U.S. state of California. Its western terminus is Point Mugu State Park and its eastern terminus is Will Rogers State Historic Park in Pacific Palisades. The trail is open to hikers throughout its length; dogs, mountain bicyclists and horseback riders are allowed on portions of the trail as posted.[2]

Source: Backbone Trail – Wikipedia



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Arizona Trail – Wikipedia

The Arizona National Scenic Trail is a National Scenic Trail from Mexico to Utah that traverses the whole north–south length of the U.S. state of Arizona. The trail begins at the Coronado National Memorial near the US–Mexico border and moves north through parts of the Huachuca, Santa Rita, and Rincon Mountains. The trail continues through the Santa Catalina north of Tucson and the Mazatzal Mountains before ascending the Mogollon Rim north of Payson, eventually leading to the higher elevations of Northern Arizona and the San Francisco Peaks. The trail then continues across the Coconino Plateau and in and out of the Grand Canyon. The Arizona Trail terminates near the Arizona-Utah border in the Kaibab Plateau region. The 800-mile (1,300 km) long Arizona Trail was completed on December 16, 2011. The trail is designed as a primitive trail for hiking, equestrians, mountain biking, and even cross country skiing, showcasing the wide variety of mountain ranges and ecosystems of Arizona.

The idea for the trail was originally developed and promoted in 1985 by Dale Shewalter, a Flagstaff, Arizona teacher.[1] The Arizona Trail was designated as a National Scenic Trail on March 30, 2009 by the Omnibus Public Land Management Act of 2009. It forms part of the 6,875-mile Great Western Loop.

Source: Arizona Trail – Wikipedia



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American Discovery Trail – Wikipedia

 

The American Discovery Trail is a system of recreational trails and roads which collectively form a coast-to-coast hiking and biking trail across the mid-tier of the United States. Horses can also be ridden on most of this trail.[1] It starts on the Delmarva Peninsula on the Atlantic Ocean and ends on the northern California coast on the Pacific Ocean. The trail has northern and southern alternates for part of its distance, passing through Chicago and St Louis respectively. The total length of the trail including both the north and south routes is 6,800 miles (10,900 km). The northern route covers 4,834 miles (7,780 km) with the southern route covering 5,057 miles (8,138 km). It is the only non-motorized coast-to-coast trail.

The trail passes through 14 national parks and 16 national forests and uses sections of or connects to five National Scenic Trails, 10 National Historic Trails, and 23 National Recreation Trails. For part of its distance, it is coincident with the North Country Trail and the Buckeye Trail.

The trail passes through the District of Columbia and the following 15 states:

Source: American Discovery Trail – Wikipedia



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